1. WEAPONS

    1. Weapon Categories
    2. Weapon Informations
    3. Simple Weapons
    4. Martial Weapons
    5. Exotic Weapons
    6. Weapon Quality
    7. Strength Ratings for Bows
    8. Ammunitions
    9. Weapon Modifications

  2. ARMOURS

    1. Armour Informations
    2. Armour Descriptions
    3. Armour Quality
    4. Armour Modifications

  3. SHIELDS

    1. Shield Descriptions
    2. Shield Quality


I. WEAPONS

Few adventurers ever manage to retain long-term ownership of weapons or other martial equipment. Combat breakages, thefts and accidents all take their toll on weaponry and often characters will need to rely on daggers and other secondary weapons, loot weapons from fallen foes or simply pick up found objects and use them to bludgeon their enemies to death.

Despite this, many adventurers have weapons they especially prefer and there are certainly advantages and disadvantages to various types of weapons. The weapons table gives full statistics for all weapons used in Conan the Roleplaying Game.

1. Weapon Categories

Weapons are grouped into several interlocking sets of categories. These categories pertain to what training is needed to become proficient in a weapon’s use (simple, martial or exotic), the weapon’s usefulness either in close combat (melee) or at a distance (ranged, which includes both thrown and projectile weapons) and its relative encumbrance (light, one-handed or two-handed).

Simple, Martial and Exotic Weapons: All player classes are proficient with all simple weapons. Many – the soldier and barbarian, for example – are also proficient with all martial weapons. A character who uses a weapon with which he is not proficient takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls.

Melee and Ranged Weapons: Melee weapons are used for making melee attacks, though some of them can be thrown as well. Ranged weapons are thrown weapons or projectile weapons that are not effective in melee.

Reach Weapons: Lances, pikes, staves, war spears and whips are reach weapons. A reach weapon is a melee weapon that allows its wielder to strike at targets that are not adjacent to him. Most reach weapons double the wielder’s natural reach, meaning that a typical Medium wielder of such a weapon can attack a creature 10 feet away but not a creature in an adjacent square. The wielder of a reach weapon can still parry an adjacent foe’s attacks with it, even if he cannot attack the foe.

Thrown Weapons: Axes, daggers, clubs, Ghanata knives, hatchets, hunting spears, javelins, knives and poniards are thrown weapons. The wielder applies his Strength modifier to damage dealt by thrown weapons, except for splash weapons. It is possible to throw a weapon that is not designed to be thrown, that is, a melee weapon that does not have a numeric entry in the Range Increment column on the Weapons table; however, a character who does so takes a –4 penalty on the attack roll. Throwing a light or one-handed weapon is a standard action, while throwing a two-handed weapon is a full- round action. Regardless of the type of weapon, such an attack scores a threat only on a natural roll of 20 and deals double damage on a critical hit. Such a weapon has a range increment of 10 feet.

Ranged Weapons: Arbalests, bows, crossbows, longbows and slings are projectile weapons. Most projectile weapons require two hands to use; see specific weapon descriptions. A character gets no Strength bonus on damage rolls with a ranged weapon unless it is specially built to grant such.

Ammunition: Ranged weapons use ammunition: arrows (for bows), bolts (for crossbows) or sling bullets (for slings). When using a bow, a character can draw ammunition as a free action; crossbows and slings require an action for reloading. Generally speaking, ammunition that hits its target is destroyed or rendered useless, while normal ammunition that misses has a 50% chance of being destroyed or lost.

Light, One-Handed and Two-Handed Melee Weapons: This designation is a measure of how much effort it takes to wield a weapon in combat. It indicates whether a melee weapon is considered a light weapon, a one-handed weapon or a two-handed weapon.

Light: A light weapon is easier to use in your off hand than a one-handed weapon and can be used while grappling. A light weapon is used in one hand. Add the wielder’s Strength bonus (if any) to damage rolls for melee attacks with a light weapon if it is used in the primary hand, or one-half the wielder’s Strength bonus if it is used in the off hand. Using two hands to wield a light weapon gives no advantage to damage; the Strength bonus applies as though the weapon were held in the wielder’s primary hand only. An unarmed strike is always considered a light weapon.

One-Handed: A one-handed weapon can be used in either the primary hand or the off hand. Add the wielder’s Strength bonus to damage rolls for melee attacks with a one-handed weapon if it is used in the primary hand, or one-half the wielder’s Strength bonus if it is used in the off hand. If a one-handed weapon is wielded with two hands during melee combat, add 1.5 times the character’s Strength bonus to damage rolls.

Two-Handed: Two hands are required to use a two-handed melee weapon effectively. Apply 1.5 times the character’s Strength bonus to damage rolls for melee attacks with such a weapon.

Double Weapons: A character can fight with both ends of a double weapon as if fighting with two weapons, but he or she incurs all the normal attack penalties associated with two-weapon combat, just as though the character were wielding a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. Add the wielder’s Strength bonus to damage rolls for the first weapon to attack and one-half the wielder’s Strength bonus for the second one. The character can also choose to use a double weapon two handed, attacking with only one end of it. If so, add 1.5 times the character’s Strength bonus to damage rolls.

Improvised Weapons: Sometimes objects not crafted to be weapons nonetheless see use in combat. As such objects are not designed for this use, any creature that uses one in combat is considered to be nonproficient with it and takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls made with that object. Using an improvised weapon to parry also applies a –1 penalty to your Parry Defence. To determine the appropriate damage for an improvised weapon, compare its relative size and damage potential to the weapon list to find a reasonable match. An improvised weapon scores a threat on a natural roll of 20 and deals double damage on a critical hit. An improvised thrown weapon has a range increment of 10 feet.

2. Weapon Informations

Here is the format for weapon entries, given as column headings on the Weapons table below:

Cost: This value is the weapon’s cost in silver pieces (sp). The cost includes miscellaneous gear that goes with the weapon.

Damage: The damage column gives the damage dealt by the weapon on a successful hit.

Critical: The entry in this column notes how the weapon is used with the rules for critical hits. When your character scores a critical hit roll the damage using all applicable modifiers, then multiply the result as indicated by the weapon’s critical multiplier.

Exception: Extra dice of damage – sneak attack damage, for example – are not multiplied when you score a critical hit.

×2: The weapon deals double damage on a critical hit.

×3: The weapon deals triple damage on a critical hit.

19–20/×2: The weapon scores a threat on a natural roll of 19 or 20 (instead of just 20) and deals double damage on a critical hit. The weapon has a threat range of 19–20.

Armour Piercing: The entry in this column indicates the number added to the wielder’s Strength modifier to determine the final armour piercing score of a successful blow and its effects on the opponent’s damage reduction.

Range Increment: Any weapon that is designed to be fired or thrown has a range increment. An attack at less than this distance is not penalized for range. However, each full range increment imposes a cumulative –2 penalty on the attack roll. A thrown weapon has a maximum range of five range increments. A projectile weapon can shoot out to 10 range increments.

Weight: This column gives the weight of the weapon.

Hardness: Hardness is, essentially, damage reduction for objects. Any damage done to a weapon or other object is reduced by its hardness. Armour Piercing never applies against an object’s hardness.

Hit Points: The number of Hit Points the weapon has. If reduced to zero, the weapon can be considered destroyed.

Type: Weapons are classified according to the type of damage they deal: bludgeoning, piercing or slashing. Some monsters may be resistant or immune to attacks from certain types of weapons. Some weapons can deal two types of damage. For example, a short sword can deal slashing or piercing damage. In a situation when the damage type is significant, the wielder can choose which type of damage to deal with such a weapon.

Origin: The origin of a weapon have an impact on the availabilty and the price of a weapon in a specific location. In addition, you'll need to get familiar with foreign weapons before being able to use them at full capacity (Treat them as if you were non proficient with these weapons).

3. Simple Weapons

Weapon
Cost (SP)
Damage
Critical
AP
Range Increment
Hardness
HP
Weight (lb)
Type
Origin
Unarmed Attacks
Unarmed Strike * (F)
--
1D3
X2
0
--
--
--
--
Bludgeoning
N/A
Boxing Strips * (F)
1
1D3
19-20 / X2
0
--
--
--
0.5
Bludgeoning
N/A
Gauntlet * (F)
5
1D6
X2
1
--
10
1
1
Bludgeoning
N/A
Knuckledusters
2
1D4
19-20 / X2
0
--
4
2
1
Bludgeoning
N/A
Light Melee Weapons
Bagh Nakh (F)
5
1D4
X2
1
--
10
1
1
Piercing
Vendhya
Dagger (F)
3
1D4
19-20 / X2
1 **
10 Ft
10
1
1
Piercing
N/A
Flame Knife (F)
10
1D4
18-20 / X2
2
--
10
1
1
Piercing
Iranistan
Gutblade
10
1D4+1
18-20 / X2
1
--
10
1
1
Piercing/Slashing
Barbarians
Hatchet (F)
2
1D6
X3
1 **
10 Ft
5
2
2
Slashing
N/A
Jambiya
6
1D4+1
18-20 / X2
1
--
10
1
1
Piercing/Slashing
Shem, Turan, Iranistan and Vendhya
Katar (F)
3
1D6
X2
1 *
--
10
1
1
Piercing
Vendhya
Knife, Yuetshi (F)
1
1D6
X2
1
--
8
1
1
Slashing
Around Vilayet sea
Knife (F)
1
1D4
X2
0
10 Ft
8
1
1
Slashing
N/A
Kukri
3
1D6
X3
2
--
10
1
1
Slashing
Vendhya
Peshkabz (F)
1
1D6
X2
3
--
12
1
1
Slashing
Vendhya
Stiletto (F)
2
1D4
X4
1
--
8
1
0.5
Piercing
N/A
One Handed Melee Weapons
Assegai
12
1D10
X2
3
--
5
4
5
Piercing/Slashing
Black Kingdoms
Cudgel
2
1D6+1
X2
2
--
5
5
3
Bludgeoning
Cimmeria and Pictish Wilderness
Club
--
1D8
X2
1 **
10 Ft
5
4
2
Bludgeoning
N/A
Kushknife
3
1D6
19-20 / X2
1
--
5
2
2
Slashing
Kush
Mace, Heavy
3
1D10
X2
4
--
7
5
4
Bludgeoning
N/A
Mace, Light
2
1D8
X2
2
--
7
3
2.5
Bludgeoning
N/A
Machete *
2
1D6
X3
2
--
8
4
3
Slashing
Jungles
Spear, Hunting (F)
2
1D8
X2
1 **
10 Ft
5
4
2
Slashing
N/A
Two-Handed Melee Weapons
Half-Moon Longspear *
50
2D6
19-20 / X2
2
--
7
4
15
Slashing
Khitai
Hyborian Pick
3
1D6
X4
3
--
5
4
5
Piercing
Hyboria
Maul
7
1D10
19-20 / X2
3
--
6
7
15
Bludgeoning
N/A
Spear, War (F) (R)
3
1D10
X3
2
--
7
4
5
Piercing
N/A
Staff * (F) (R)
--
2D4
X2
1
--
5
5
3
Bludgeoning
N/A
Ranged Weapons
Bow, Hunting
3
1D8
X2
1 **
50 Ft
5
2
1
Piercing
N/A
Discus
2
1D4
X2
1
40 Ft
3
1
2
Bludgeoning
Argos
Long Darts (5)
1
1D6
19-20 / X2
1 **
30 Ft
2
1
1
Piercing
N/A
Javelin
3
1D8
X2
1 **
30 Ft
5
3
2
Piercing
N/A

* See the weapon description for special rules
** The Armour Piercing score for all ranged weapons is reduced by one for each range increment beyond the first
(F) Finesse weapon
(R) Reach weapon

Assegai

Known in the Black Kingdoms as an iXwa, the assegai is a short stabbing spear with a wide, long blade kept so sharp that it is used for shaving. The assegai is usually used in conjunction with a shield, but can be used with two hands if one wants.

Bagh Nakh

The Vendhyan bagh nakh is a nasty concealed weapon along the lines of brass knuckles with spikes. It is commonly held hidden in the hand with the claws on the palm side, not projecting from the knuckles. The weapon punches nasty wounds in unarmoured foes.

Bow, Hunting

These small, simple bows are used around the world, both for hunting and combat. Any bow other than one of the regional longbows can be treated as a hunting bow. Hunting bows require two hands for use. They may be used while mounted. If you have a Strength penalty, apply it to damage when using a hunting bow.

Boxing Strips

A set of knotted bull’s hide strips worn around the knuckles to make boxing blows more damaging and to protect the knuckles themselves. Designed more as sports equipment than weapons, boxing strips nevertheless allow you to deal lethal damage rather than nonlethal damage with unarmed strikes. A strike with boxing strips is otherwise considered an unarmed attack. The cost and weight given are for a complete set of strips for both hands.

Club

The club is perhaps the simplest of man-made weapons. It is most often found in primitive countries but may also be used by peasants and city mobs in more civilised nations.

Cudgel

A cudgel is a specialised form of club that has an enlarged head for short swings. A number of Cimmerian clans and Pictish tribes use cudgels as their standard infantry weapon due to their inexpensive nature.

Dagger

The dagger is an all-purpose weapon and tool, carried by almost everyone over the age of ten or so in the Hyborian countries. Most daggers have double-edged blades, making them more useful for stabbing than cutting but they are still short and handy enough to have many roles outside of combat.

Discus

A flat disk of fire-baked clay or chiselled stone, the discus is an implement often used in Argossean tests of physical skill. When hurled properly, the discus can reach great distances at remarkable speeds, making it a deadly projectile. Unlike most ranged attacks, the Armour Piercing rating of a discus is never lowered for the distance it travels.

Flame Knife

The Iranistani flame knife operates on the same principle as a flamberge, although applied to a double-edged dagger instead of a greatsword.

Gauntlet

Gauntlets come free with all medium and heavy armours but some characters may elect to buy a gauntlet by itself as a weapon. A gauntlet cannot be removed with a disarm action.

Gutblade

A tiny weapon, the gutblade is a single-edged dagger with an arrow shaped tip and a sharp backward sweeping hook on the front of the blade. Designed by barbarian tribes for skinning and gutting, this blade often sees use as a secondary weapon in battle.

Half-Moon Longspear

A Khitan adaptation of the war spear, the half-moon shaped blade of this weapon makes it ideal for dismounting attackers. Any rider hit by a half- moon longspear must make a Ride check at DC 10 + attack roll of attacker, or be dismounted.

Hatchet

The hatchet is more of a woodsman’s tool than a weapon, though it is often pressed into service in combat. Many armies carry a number of hatchets too, simply for cutting firewood, though a lowly man-at-arms or mercenary may certainly carry one onto the battlefield.

Hyborian Pick

In the ages before the greatsword became the traditional weapon of Hyborian peoples, weapons derived from tools were much more common. A good pick was useful for early settlements, and so the sharpened iron tools became good for war as well. These weapons still find use in the hands of some lower class warriors.

Jambiya

The jambiya is a curved dagger used in eastern Shem, Turan, Iranistan and Vendhya.

Javelin

The javelin is a light throwing spear rarely seen among the Hyborian military but sometimes used by more primitive armies. It is rather better balanced for throwing than the hunting spear but is a little too fragile for effective use in melee combat.

Katar

The katar is a punching dagger of Vendhya. Some versions are scissored to allow two side blades to spring free of the central dagger to make +2 AP.

Knife, Yuetshi

This is a long, saw-edged knife with a crescent-shaped blade. It is wielded by the Yuetshi fishermen of the southern Vilayet sea.

Knife

A short, single-edged cutting tool, the knife can only really be effective as a weapon against unarmoured or defenceless foes.

Knuckledusters

A metal rod inserted in front of the knuckles of a sewn leather glove or gauntlet, knuckledusters add some impact and lethality to the wearer’s punches.

Kukri

The Kukri is a heavy forward curving dagger meant for slashing. It serves the Vendhyans in place of a dagger and/or hand axe, able to perform the functions of either in a superior manner.

Kushknife

Named for the long-bladed knives carried by the Esshura tribe of mercenary tribesmen, each Kushknife is carved from one piece of bone before being soaked in a variety of saps and waxes to give it a near-metal hardness and edge. Long, slender and wickedly sharp, the Kushknife is perfect for shearing through the light armour of Kushite tribal folk.

Long Darts

Wooden lengths tipped with metal points and fletched with thick goose or swan feathers, long darts are like miniature javelins. Skirmishers and hurlers in small units can inflict heavy casualties on lightly armoured targets with volleys of these missiles.

Mace, Heavy or Light

The mace consists of a wooden or metal shaft topped with a heavy, blunt striking surface, usually flanged or ball-shaped. It is very effective against armour, crushing both the protection and the warrior inside it.

Machete

A stout piece of metal driven into a wooden handle and sharpened on one edge, the machete is perfect for cleaving limbs as well as underbrush. Characters that use a machete to travel through jungle or heavy forested areas can add a +2 bonus to their Survival skill to navigate such terrain.

Maul

Heavy wooden hammers with large square heads, mauls are used for driving tent poles or picket stakes in single overhead swings. Someone with strong enough upper body strength can also deliver bone-crushing blows with a maul and some warriors reinforce these tools with iron bands or spikes to create ‘war mauls’.

Peshkabz

The Peshkabz, with its T-shaped cross-section, is a Vendhyan dagger designed to pierce armour.

Spear, Hunting

The hunting spear is light enough to be wielded with one hand and is commonly used in pairs, with the first spear being flung and the second used to finish off the wounded animal. Some warriors from primitive countries use a hunting spear and shield in war.

Spear, War

This is a long, heavy spear with a broad, often leaf-shaped head. The war spear is a reach weapon; a character wielding it may attack foes who are 10 feet away but may not attack adjacent enemies.

Staff

The staff is fully eight or nine feet long, a thick piece of oak or ash, usually shod at each end with iron. When wielded with both hands close to the butt it provides a good five to six feet of striking length, held towards the enemy and used for thrusts, sweeps and swings. A staff is a reach weapon but unlike more usual reach weapons it may be used freely to attack both adjacent opponents and those who are 10 feet away.

Stiletto

This is a long, narrow-bladed dagger, favoured at court and much used by noble ladies and assassins.

Unarmed Strike

When you have lost your broadsword and poniard, or when you just want to prove a point, a fist to the jaw can be a devastatingly effective weapon.

4. Martial Weapons

Weapon
Cost (SP)
Damage
Critical
AP
Range Increment
Hardness
HP
Weight (lb)
Type
Origin
Unarmed
Swordfist *
35
1D6
19-20 / X2
2
--
8
5
4
Piercing/Slashing
Gladiators
War Gauntlet *
20
1D6
X3
2
--
5
3
2
Bludgeoning/Piercing
N/A
Light Melee Weapons
Axe (F)
3
1D8
X3
1 **
10 Ft
5
3
2
Slashing
N/A
Khandar *
125
1D10
X2 *
3
--
12
5
3
Slashing
Vendhya
Knife, Ghanata (F)
2
1D8
X2
1 **
10 Ft
8
3
2
Slashing
Stygia, Kush and Darfar
Kora
50
1D8
19-20 / X2
1
--
10
3
1.5
Slashing
Vendhya
Pommel *
*
1D4
X2
1
--
*
*
*
Bludgeoning
N/A
Poniard (F)
10
1D6
19-20 / X2
1 **
5 Ft
10
2
1
Slashing
N/A
Sap *
1
1D6
X3
0
--
1
1
0.5
Bludgeoning
Criminals
Sword, Short (F)
50
1D8
19-20 / X2
1
--
10
3
1.5
Slashing/Piercing
N/A
One Handed Melee Weapons
Axe-Mace
75
1D10
X3
5
--
7
5
9
Slashing/Bludgeoning
Asgard and Vanaheim
Battleaxe
5
1D10
X3
4
--
7
5
3
Slashing
N/A
Broadsword *
125
1D10
19-20 / X2
3
--
10
5
2.5
Slashing
Hyboria
Cutlass
50
1D10
19-20 / X2
2
--
8
5
2
Slashing
Mariners and Pirates
Khopesh
240
2D4
18-20 / X2
4
--
10
9
4
Slashing
Stygia
Knife, Zhaibar
25
1D12
19-20 / X2
1
--
8
6
3
Slashing
Ghulistan
Lance, Heavy *
7
1D10
X3
3
--
5
8
7
Piercing
N/A
Lance, Light *
5
1D10
X3
2
--
5
5
4
Piercing
N/A
Rapier (F)
50
2D4
18-20 / X2
4
--
6
4
2.5
Piercing
Zingara
Scimitar (F)
75
1D8
18-20 / X2
2
--
10
5
2.5
Slashing
Around Vilayet sea and Shem
Stygian Scimitar
80
2D4
18-20 / X2
2
--
10
5
3
Slashing
Stygia
Sword, Arming (F)
100
1D10
19-20 / X2
2
--
10
4
2
Slashing/Piercing
N/A
Warhammer
7
1D6
X3
7
--
7
4
4
Bludgeoning/Piercing
N/A
War Mace
35
1D8
X4
2
--
6
5
6
Bludgeoning/Slashing
Black Kingdoms
Two-Handed Melee Weapons
Bardiche
8
2D10
X3
5
--
7
10
7
Slashing
N/A
Bec-de-Corbin
30
2D4
X4
7
--
7
10
12
Piercing/Bludgeoning
Zingara
Bill *
7
2D8
X3
6
--
7
10
6
Slashing/Piercing
Hyboria
Bladespear * (R)
20
2D6
19-20 / X2
3
--
8
6
6
Slashing
Around Vilayet sea
Claymore *
60
2D6
X3
3
--
10
8
4
Slashing/Piercing
Cimmeria
Club, War
3
2D6
X2
4
--
5
10
6
Bludgeoning
N/A
Halberd (R)
100
2D8
X3
5
--
8
7
8
Slashing/Piercing
Hyboria
Kusani Axe (R)
30
1D12
X3
4
--
8
8
10
Slashing
Kusan
Nordheimir Double-Handed Axe
8
2D10
X3
5
--
7
10
7
Slashing
Asgard and Vanaheim
Pike * (R)
5
2D6
X3
2
--
5
8
10
Piercing
N/A
Pollaxe *
8
2D6
X3
8
--
7
10
7
Slashing/Piercing
N/A
Sabre *
125
1D10
18-20 / X2
2
--
10
8
4
Slashing
Around Vilayet sea
Sword, War * (F)
150
1D12
19-20 / X2
3
--
10
8
4
Slashing/Piercing
N/A
Ranged Weapons
Arbalest *
15
2D8
X2
6 **
70 Ft
6
5
20
Piercing
Hyboria
Crossbow *
12
2D6
X2
4 **
60 Ft
5
4
15
Piercing
Hyboria
Horsebow *
5
2D4
X2
1 **
40 Ft
5
3
2
Piercing
Around Vilayet sea
Sling
1
1D8
X3
1 **
40 Ft
--
--
0
Bludgeoning
N/A

* See the weapon description for special rules
** The Armour Piercing score for all ranged weapons is reduced by one for each range increment beyond the first
(F) Finesse weapon
(R) Reach weapon

Arbalest

This is a heavy and powerful steel-framed crossbow, designed for penetrating armour and long-range effectiveness. An arbalest is very slow to load, as it must be braced against the ground and laboriously ‘spanned’ with a mechanical device called a cranequin before a new bolt can be loaded in place. Reloading takes three full-round actions, so few adventurers bother to reload their arbalests during combat. An arbalest must be wielded with both hands.

Axe

The axe is an effective off-hand weapon or backup weapon, easily carried in a loop on the belt and reasonably effective against armour. It can also be used to hook enemy weapons.

Axe-Mace

This heavy and somewhat unwieldy weapon is most common among some primitive tribes and in the hands of warriors from cultures that value strength over finesse. With a single edged axe blade mounted to one side of a thick, spiked mace head, axe-maces tend to have very long handles to provide a much needed counterbalance. Axe- maces provide their wielders with the versatility to deal either massive slashing or severe bludgeoning damage as the combat situation demands.

Bardiche

The bardiche is a heavy axe-blade mounted on a thick ash shaft some four to six feet long. Though the blade is also quite large, it is highly curved so as to concentrate the initial impact into a very small area. This combination allows for both excellent armour penetration and the possibility of dealing heavy damage.

Battleaxe

The battleaxe is a powerful weapon, ideal for dealing deadly overhead blows from horseback but also sufficiently well-balanced for fast-moving melee combat. Mounted mercenaries favour it especially, since it is relatively cheap but highly effective against armoured enemies.

Bec-de-Corbin

This weapon takes the form of a small polearm with a small combined hammer and pick at its head. Swinging with great force, the wielder is able to concentrate all the energy of his blows into the sharp, pick end of the weapon, enabling him to cause a great deal of damage against the most heavily armoured of enemies, and the Bec-de-Corbin is commonly found in the hands of any warrior looking to battle metal-clad knights. The bec-de-corbin may be used as a piercing weapon with its pick-head or a bludgeoning weapon with its hammer. However, it may not be used as both within the same combat round. It was developed in northern Zingara by warriors harried by Poitainian knights.

Bill

This versatile polearm was originally derived from a hedging tool mounted on a long shaft but is in common use by heavy infantry and city watchmen alike. Nemedian soldiers, militia and mercenaries favour its use. A bill has a spearhead, curved axe-head and hook, all forged from a single blade and mounted on a shaft around six feet long. In better quality weapons the shaft will be protected by steel langets extending down most of its length from the head. You can use a ready action to set a bill against a charge, in which case it deals double damage on a successful hit against a charging character. A bill may be used to make trip attempts. A character who is wielding a bill and who is tripped while making a trip attempt may drop the bill to avoid being tripped in return.

Bladespear

A spear haft topped with a long blade similar to a scimitar’s, the bladespear is designed like a smaller polearm, but is often held high on the haft and used at close quarters. Many Turanian hoplites use bladespears, giving them excellent versatility. The wielder of a bladespear can alter his grip on the weapon as a move action, changing it to or from a reach weapon.

Broadsword

This heavy, slightly tapered sword is intended for battlefield use and is often wielded by knights expecting to face lightly armoured enemies. It is too expensive for most mercenaries but many adventurers favour broadswords for their good balance and reasonable effectiveness against armour. Though the broadsword’s handgrip is clearly only long enough for one hand to grip it comfortably, the pommel is large and often disc-shaped, allowing for a warrior to get his second hand behind the blow if need be and use the weapon two-handed. A broadsword being wielded two-handed can be used as a finesse weapon if desired.

Claymore

A famous Cimmerian greatsword, Claymore are usually between four and six feet long, with a double-edged blade and extended hilt for a two-handed grip. Some of these weapons feature drooping crossguards, and most have a leather-covered ricasso (A ricasso is an unsharpened length of blade just above the guard), which allows the shoulder of the blade to be gripped for better control in close-quarter fighting. The claymore is a weapon that requires strength and control to wield effectively, and its weight and length gives it significant momentum that can be used to advantage when fighting multiple opponents. When used by a character with the Cleave feat, a successful Strength check (DC 15) allows one additional Cleave attack in a round.

Club, War

War clubs are used by warriors who cannot afford anything better, or who live in areas where better weapons are not generally manufactured.

Crossbow

Crossbows are favoured by countries that do not have many troops capable of wielding any type of longbow, which includes many of the Hyborian nations. It is reasonably quick to fire, as it can be reset by hand. Despite this, the experienced warrior will find a bow of any kind allows a far more rapid rate of fire. A crossbow requires two hands to fire. It may be reloaded as a full-round action.

Cutlass

Cutlasses are shorter than broadswords but almost as heavy and damaging. For this reason they are much-used by pirates, who need a weapon that is not likely to get entangled in rigging or stuck in the low ceilings below decks. Any one- handed weapon larger than the cutlass that is wielded in such a low-ceilinged environment is used with a –2 circumstance penalty to the attack roll.

Halberd

One of the more difficult weapons to manufacture, the traditional halberd is a polearm topped with a wide axe-like blade that has a single spike at the top. Expensive to create due to the amount of skill it takes to forge the head properly, halberds are not often chosen as standard infantry weapons. They are more frequently seen in the hands of elite soldiers or royal guards.

Horsebow

Used by Hyrkanian horse riders. The horsebow is an oversized hunting bow with a pronounced lower curve perfectly suited for use on the back of a warhorse. These bows can fire regular arrows (at –2 damage), but are designed to use much longer ammunition. These special arrows gain a +2 bonus to hit and damage when fired from horseback at targets within the first range increment.

Khandar

This Vendhyan sword has a straight blade made of reinforced Vendhyan steel and is designed solely for hacking foes apart. A bar projects from the pommel, allowing it to be wielded with two hands for more powerful blows, changing the critical damage to x3.

Khopesh

The khopesh is an unwieldy, Stygian sickle-type sword that is heavier than a scimitar but capable of causing a lot of damage in the hands of an unsophisticated warrior, making it an excellent weapon for conscripted infantry troops. The khopesh has about seven inches of hilt, another 15 inches of straight blade, then the weapon curves into a crescent for the next 11 inches.

Knife, Ghanata

The Ghanata knife is commonly used by the tribesmen of the Southern Desert. It is two feet long, heavy, razor-sharp and slightly curved.

Knife, Zhaibar

The Zhaibar knife is as long as most swords, though it is shaped very much like a large knife, with a thicker blade than any sword. It is used throughout Ghulistan. The blade is three feet long, triangular and intended for slashing rather than thrusting. Most Zhaibar knives are bone-handled.

Kora

Essentially a Vendhyan short sword, this weapon has a forward curving blade with an extremely wide end, much like an axe. The sharp side is on the concave portion. This weapon is often used to perform ceremonial sacrifices in the incensed temples of Vendhya.

Kusani Axe

Used almost solely by the royal headsmen of the tribes of Kusan, the Kusani axe is a sickle-bladed poleaxe that puts a massive amount of impact behind each swing.The haft of each axe is as big around as a man’s arm, allowing for a much longer reach on every swing – if the wielder’s arms are strong enough.

Lance, Heavy

A heavy lance used from the back of a charging mount does double damage and has a +2 circumstance bonus to Armour Piercing. A heavy lance has reach: you can use it against opponents ten feet away but you may not use it against an adjacent enemy. Heavy lances are intended for use when mounted and are unbalanced for use on foot; if used while dismounted, treat a heavy lance as a war spear with a –2 circumstance penalty to all attack rolls.

Lance, Light

A light lance used from the back of a charging mount does double damage and has a +1 circumstance bonus to Armour Piercing. Light lances are intended for use when mounted but can still be reasonably effective on foot; if used while dismounted, treat a light lance as a hunting spear.

Nordheimir Double-Handed Axe

The long double-handed war-axes of the Aesir and Vanir essentially function as bardiches.

Pike

Pikes are extremely long spears. A pike is a special variety of reach weapon. A character wielding a pike can attack opponents who are 15 feet or 20 feet away, but cannot attack adjacent opponents or opponents who are 10 feet away.

Pollaxe

With an axe-head backed by a warhammer-head, the whole thing surmounted by a spear-point, the pollaxe is a versatile if heavy weapon. The ash shaft is usually around four to five feet long and protected by steel langets. You can use a ready action to set a pollaxe against a charge, in which case it deals double damage on a successful hit against a charging character.

Pommel

A pommel is the heavy steel counterweight on every sword-hilt. The following weapons can all be used to make pommel attacks: dagger, poniard, Ghanata knife, short sword, Zhaibar knife, arming sword, broadsword, scimitar, cutlass, sabre, war sword, greatsword and tulwar. Pommel attacks are useful when you wish to make a bludgeoning attack, or when you need to use a light weapon – for example, when grappling an enemy. A pommel can also be used to make a stun attempt using the Stunning Fist feat if you have it, just as though the pommel were an unarmed strike.

Poniard

This is a long, heavy dagger designed for war and favoured by fighting men as an off-hand or secondary weapon. The blade is usually 15 inches to 19 inches long, with the pommel, guard and handle bringing the total size of the weapon to over two feet.

Rapier

The favorite weapon of Zingaran’s swordsmen. A rapier is known for its extraordinary keen edge. This allows the blade to cut deeper and do more damage in general.

Sabre

The sabre is a common cavalry weapon in the East. It is intended for one-handed use from horseback, or two-handed use on foot. Although it is classified as an exotic weapon, it may be wielded as a martial weapon by a mounted character, or by a character using it in both hands.
Movement
Hands Used
Classification
Mounted
One Handed
Martial
Mounted
Two Handed
Exotic
On Foot
One Handed
Exotic
On Foot
Two Handed
Martial

Sap

A sap comes in handy when you want to knock an opponent our instead of killing him. It always deals non lethal damage and your opponent must succeed a fortitude check (DC = DMG) if you score a critical hit. With a sap, a rogue can make a sneak attack that deals nonlethal damage instead of lethal damage.

Scimitar

The scimitar is the Eastern equivalent of the sword, with a heavy, curved blade that provides extreme cutting power. It is the most common weapon among Hyrkanian and Shemite nomads.

Sling

The most basic projectile weapon, the sling is still highly effective, hurling lead bullets capable of breaking limbs or smashing skulls.

Stygian Scimitar

A localised variant of the common single-bladed, curved sword, the Stygian scimitar has a distinct shape. The blade has an end that is twice as wide as where it connects with its hilt, and a flare to its back side that is given a sharpened edge to inflict wounds on the fore and backswing of the deadly sword.

Sword, Arming

The arming sword resembles the broadsword but is slightly shorter and lighter and often not quite so well made. Knights and mercenaries whose main weapon is a broadsword, battleaxe, heavy mace or two-handed weapon carry an arming sword as a backup weapon and some archers and crossbowmen also use it. Furthermore, it is the only weapon in its class light enough to be a finesse weapon. Well made, fancy-looking versions of the arming sword are often worn about town by nobles and other well-to-do types, since it does not attract quite so much attention as the more obviously military broadsword.

Sword, Short

The short sword is somewhere between the arming sword and poniard in length, with a blade some two feet long or a little longer. It is handy, concealable and can be used as a finesse weapon, making it much favoured by thieves and skirmishers.

Sword, War

Also known as a bastard sword or hand-and- a-half sword, the war sword is intended for one-handed use from horseback, or two-handed use on foot. Although it is classified as an exotic weapon, it may be wielded as a martial weapon by a mounted character, or by a character using it in both hands. Note that its game statistics are slightly different depending on whether it is being wielded in one hand or two. Any time a war sword is being wielded in two hands, it may be used as a finesse weapon and to make piercing attacks. The table below summarises the various uses of the war sword.
Movement
Hands Used
Classification
Finesse?
Mounted
One Handed
Martial
No
Mounted
Two Handed
Exotic
Yes
On Foot
One Handed
Exotic
No
On Foot
Two Handed
Martial
Yes

Swordfist

A weapon of gladiators, the swordfist is a forged metal gauntlet with no fingers. Instead of having any flexibility to it, the gauntlet is actually a brace for a two-foot long straight sword blade. Using a swordfist allows the wielder to use either his unarmed or sword styled feats and abilities. For instance, a warrior with a swordfist could use his Weapon Focus (unarmed) or Improved Critical (shortsword), but not both.

War Gauntlet

A heavier version of the common gauntlet, a war gauntlet is actually a full armlet of riveted metal that protects up to the elbow joint. Along the back of the thick fingers are rows of spines or sometimes even blades, with a set of jagged protrusions following suit to the bottom of the forearm. Although its design means that no weapon may be wielded or fine manipulation performed by that hand, its extensive metal construction does give the wearer the benefits of wearing a shield.

Warhammer

Though referred to as a warhammer, this weapon has a head that more closely resembles a meat tenderiser, used for bashing in the joints of an armoured opponent. The spike on the reverse of the head looks a little like a pickaxe blade and can be used to pierce right through heavy armour. The head is mounted on a three-foot long shaft of ash, allowing for good leverage.

Warmace

The warmace is a common sight amongst Black Kingdoms warriors, as it is frequently used by their elite warriors to smash their foes to ruin. It is a solid piece of wood or bone (rarely metal) that has a dozen or more blades of copper or volcanic glass set in its wider end. The warmace inflicts heinous wounds when it strikes vital areas.

5. Exotic Weapons

Weapon
Cost (SP)
Damage
Critical
AP
Range Increment
Hardness
HP
Weight (lb)
Type
Origin
Unarmed
Claw Bracer *
30
1D6
19-20 / X2
3
--
8
5
2
Piercing
Vendhya
Panther Claw *
75
1D6
X3
2
--
8
2
1
Piercing
Khitai and Lemuria
Tiger Claw *
5
1D6
X2
2
--
8
5
2
Piercing/Slashing
Khitai and Lemuria
Light Melee Weapons
Main Gauche *
1
1D6
19-20 / X2
1
--
10
3
1.5
Piercing
Zingara
Sai *
1
1D6
X2
1
--
10
3
1.5
Piercing
Khitai and Lemuria
Stump Knife *
8
1D6
19-20 / X2
3
--
8
5
2
Piercing
Pirates
War Fan *
30
1D8
X3
0
--
2
1
0.5
Slashing
Temptress
One Handed Melee Weapons
Chain and Dagger * (R) (F)
10
1D6
19-20 / X2
1
--
5
5
4
Piercing
N/A
Flail * (R)
15
1D8
18-20 / X2
3
--
10
5
8
Bludgeoning
Hyboria
Net *
20
--
--
--
10 Ft
2
4
6
N/A
Slavers and Gladiators
Sabre *
125
1D10
18-20 / X2
2
--
10
8
4
Slashing
Around Vilayet sea
Scourge * (F)
5
1D8
X2
0
--
4
2
4
Slashing
Slavers
Sword, War *
150
1D12
19-20 / X2
3
--
10
8
4
Slashing
N/A
Trident
15
1D10
X3
2
10 Ft
6
8
4
Piercing
Mariners and Gladiators
Whip * (R) (F)
2
1D4
X2
0
--
2
2
1
Slashing
Slavers
Whip-Dagger * (R) (F)
25
1D8
X2
0
--
2
2
3
Slashing
Slavers
Two-Handed Melee Weapons
Duom * (R)
20
1D10
X3
3
--
7
4
8
Piercing
Hyboria
Flamberge
780
2D10
18-20 / X2
5
--
10
10
6
Slashing/Piercing
Nemedia
Greatsword
200
2D10
19-20 / X2
4
--
10
10
6
Slashing/Piercing
Hyboria
Gada
30
3D6
X2
4
--
5
10
6
Bludgeoning
Vendhya
Gyrspike *
90
1D10/1D8
19-20 / X2
3/5
--
12
10
15
Slashing/Bludgeoning
Hyboria
Scimitar, Double (F)
125
1D8/1D8
18-20 / X2
2/2
--
12
8
10
Slashing
Around Vilayet sea
Talwar
150
3D6
X2
3
--
10
10
6
Slashing
Vendhya
Tulwar
150
2D8
18-20 / X2
3
--
10
10
6
Slashing
Around Vilayet sea
Zweihanders
100
4D4
X4
3
--
10
10
6
Slashing
Aquilonia
Ranged Weapons
Bola, 3-ball *
15
1D6
X2
0
10 Ft
2
3
4
Bludgeoning
N/A
Blowgun
30
1D4
X2
1 **
10 Ft
2
2
1
Piercing
Forest Lands
Bow, Hyrkanian
25
1D10
19-20 / X2
3 **
100 Ft
5
3
2
Piercing
Around Vilayet sea
Bow, Shemite
25
1D10
X3
4 **
100 Ft
5
3
2
Piercing
Shem
Bow, Stygian *
30
1D12
19-20 / X2
2 **
60 Ft
5
4
3
Piercing
Stygia
Chakram
15
1D6
X3
2 **
30 Ft
5
2
2
Slashing
Vendhya
Crossbow, Hand *
30
2D4
19-20 / X2
2 **
30 Ft
5
2
5
Piercing
Hyboria
Crossbow, Wrist *
50
1D6
19-20 / X2
2 **
20 Ft
5
2
5
Piercing
Hyboria
Fukimi-Bari *
1
1D2
X2
0
5 Ft
--
--
0.1
Piercing
Khitai and Lemuria
Harpoon *
10
1D12
X3
4 **
20 Ft
5
4
12
Piercing
Mariners and Pirates
Longbow, Bossonian *
20
1D12
X3
5 **
80 Ft
5
3
2
Piercing
Bossonian Marches

* See the weapon description for special rules
** The Armour Piercing score for all ranged weapons is reduced by one for each range increment beyond the first
(F) Finesse weapon
(R) Reach weapon

Blowgun

A blowgun is a long, hollow tube fashioned from wood or metal, used to launch tiny darts or needles at opponents by expelling a mighty puff of air through one end. Most often used by barbarians such as Amazons, blowgun projectiles are commonly coated with drugs or poisons to increase their effectiveness. A blowgun requires two hands to use and loading a projectile counts as a move equivalent action that provokes an attack of opportunity. Unlike most projectile weapons, a blowgun has a maximum range of five increments.

Bola, 3-ball

The bola is a hunting weapon designed in the Black Kingdoms for bird-hunting. The 3- or 4-ball bola is made from heavy wooden or even metal spheres, connected by a length of chain or strong cord and is a weapon designed to both damage and trip an opponent at range. When you throw and hit with the bolas, the target is tripped and may not trip you. If the target fails a Grapple check versus your attack roll, it is also grappled. A bola may only grapple Large creatures or smaller. Any grappled creature may not fly. The target can free itself from the bolas as a full-round action.

Bow, Hyrkanian

The Hyrkanian bow is a composite bow made from horn, wood and sinew. A Hyrkanian bow requires both hands to shoot and may be used while mounted. Hyrkanian bows all have strength ratings.

Bow, Shemite

The Shemite bow is very similar to the Hyrkanian bow. A Shemite bow requires both hands to shoot and may be used while mounted. Shemite bows all have strength ratings.

Bow, Stygian

The Stygian bow is heavy and powerful, shooting a long, weighty arrow that does a great deal of damage but will not travel so far as most other arrows. A Stygian bow requires both hands to shoot and may not be used while mounted, though the Stygian nobility often use them from chariots. Stygian bows all have strength ratings.

Chain and Dagger

When wielding the chain-and- dagger, you gain a +2 bonus on your opposed attack roll when attempting to disarm an opponent (including the roll to keep from being disarmed yourself, if you fail to disarm your foe). You can also use this weapon to make trip attacks, gaining a +2 bonus on your trip attempt. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can opt to drop the chain-and- dagger instead of being tripped.

Chakram

The chakram is a throwing disk about 1 foot in diameter, with a sharpened outer rim.

Claw Bracer

A claw bracer is a metal armband with three steel claws projecting from the top, extending about 4 inches beyond the tip of the wearer’s extended fingers. The wearer can cast spells normally while wearing the bracer and cannot be disarmed.

Crossbow, Hand

Single hand crossbows tend to be less damaging than comparable two-handed bows and crossbows. Easy to conceal and flexible to use, the weapon gives the ability to launch surprise attacks on their targets, often allow multiple shots in quick succession from several preloaded Hand Crossbows. You can draw a hand crossbow back by hand. Loading a hand crossbow is a move action that provokes an attack of opportunity. You can shoot, but not load, a hand crossbow with one hand at no penalty. You can shoot a hand crossbow with each hand, but you take a penalty on attack rolls as if attacking with two light weapons.

Crossbow, Wrist

This appears to be some sort of light-weight crossbow that straps to your wrist and can be fired that like a hand crossbow. A small string is attached to your finger and tied via pully system to the firing mechanism. Loading a wrist crossbow is a move action that provokes an attack of opportunity. You can shoot, but not load, a wrist crossbow with one hand at no penalty. You cannot use another weapon with the wrist crossbow, however, you can hold an item in that hand while firing. You can mount the wrist mounted crossbow on the underside of the forearm and conceal it with a sleight of hand bonus of +2, but you also take an additional -2 to attack rolls while using it mounted in this position.

Duom

The duom is a longspear with a standard spearhead, as well as two blades curved so that they point backward along the shaft. The weapon has reach, allowing you to strike opponents 10 feet away with it. Those proficient with the duom can also attack adjacent foes with the reversed heads using a practiced “reverse thrust.” Apply a –2 penalty on the attack roll if you use the duom to attack a second, adjacent opponent in the same round you attacked the first opponent.

Flail

This awkward but powerful weapon is a favourite of gladiators and heavy infantry. A flail is a stout rod of hard wood that has a metre-long series of chain links driven into one end that attach to the weapon’s head – a cylinder of metal or stone often set with spikes or bladed flanges. Because of the whipping motion and arm strength it requires to wield a flail, few are skilled enough to use it. Flail attacks made by a proficient wielder impose a –3 penalty on the Parry Defence of a target (Dodge Defence is unchanged).

Flamberge

The Nemedian flamberge is a huge, wavy sword. The waved design increases the surface area available for swings, allowing a warrior to cut through his opponent’s defences with ease and cause crippling damage. It is difficult to construct and expensive.

Fukimi-Bari

These slim, almost needle-like metal darts are concealed in the mouth, then spit at the target. Their effective range is extremely short, and they deal little damage, but they are highly useful when taking an opponent by surprise. You can fire up to three fukimi-bari per attack (all at the same target). Do not apply your Strength modifier to damage with fukimi-bari. They are too small to carry the extra force that a strong character usually imparts to a thrown weapon. The cost and weight are for a single fukimi-bari.

Gada

The gada is a large war-club associated with martial arts in Vendhya and its various militant gods. It is noted for its oversized head. The weapon is often made of brass and is the holy weapon of Hanuman.

Greatsword

Possibly the most powerful weapon fielded on the battlefield by most Hyborian nations, the greatsword is a large, no-nonsense sword. Adventurers of Nemedia are particularly noted for wielding greatswords but most other Hyborian armies have at least a few knights armed with this deadly weapon.

Gyrspike

A gyrspike is a double weapon. A stout shaft holds a flail on one end and a longsword on the other. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties for two-weapon fighting, as if you were using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. You get a +2 bonus on your opposed attack roll when attempting to disarm an enemy when you wield a gyrspike (including the opposed attack roll to avoid being disarmed yourself if you fail to disarm your enemy). You can also use this weapon to make trip attacks. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the gyrspike to avoid being tripped.

Harpoon

A harpoon is a spear tipped with wicked barbs and linked to a trailing rope (20 to 50 feet long) by a metal hoop at the end of the shaft. Typically used to hunt whales, dolphins and other large sea creatures, a harpoon can nevertheless be used against land-bound opponents. If you inflict damage on your opponent, the harpoon may lodge in the victim if the victim fails a Reflex saving throw against a DC of 10 + the damage you inflicted. An ensnared creature suffers a –1 on attack rolls and a –2 penalty to Dexterity, can move at only half speed, and cannot charge or run. If you control the trailing rope by succeeding at an opposed Strength check while holding it, the harpooned creature can only move within the limits that the rope allows. If the harpooned creature attempts to cast a spell, it must succeed at a Concentration check (DC 15) or lose the spell. The harpooned creature can pull the harpoon from its wound if it has two free hands and takes a full- round action to do so, but in so doing it takes damage equal to the initial damage the harpoon dealt. For example, if you hit a creature with a harpoon and deal 8 points of damage and the creature removes the harpoon, it takes another 8 points of damage.

Longbow, Bossonian

The Bossonian longbow has justly made the Bossonian Marches famous for the quality and deadliness of their archers. This massive yew bow does not quite have the range of the Hyrkanian or Shemite bows but the Bossonian archers make up for this with deadly accuracy once the enemy is within range and utter steadfastness when he is not. A Bossonian longbow requires both hands to shoot and may not be used while mounted. If you have a Strength penalty, apply it to damage when using a Bossonian longbow. Bossonian longbows all have strength ratings.

Main Gauche

A long dagger used in the left hand mainly for parrying. A Main Gauche gives you a +3 shield bonus. The Weapon Focus Feat (Main Gauche) gives you an additionnal +1 shield bonus.

Net

A net is used to entangle enemies. When you throw a net, you make a ranged touch attack against your target. A net’s maximum range is 10 feet. If you hit, the target is entangled. An entangled creature takes a –2 penalty on attack rolls and a –4 penalty on Dexterity, can move at only half speed and cannot charge or run. If you control the trailing rope by succeeding on an opposed Strength check while holding it, the entangled creature can move only within the limits that the rope allows. If the entangled creature attempts to cast a spell, it must make a DC 15 Concentration check or be unable to cast the spell. An entangled creature can escape with a DC 20 Escape Artist check (a full-round action). The net has 5 hit points and can be burst with a DC 25 Strength check (also a full-round action). A net is useful only against creatures within one size category of you. A net must be folded to be thrown effectively. The first time you throw your net in a fight, you make a normal ranged touch attack roll. After the net is unfolded, you take a –4 penalty on attack rolls with it. It takes 2 rounds for a proficient user to fold a net and twice that long for a nonproficient one to do so.

Panther Claw

The panther claw looks much like a punch dagger with two extra blades. The weapon retains the punch dagger’s deadly force, and the extra blades are useful for disarming opponents. Wielders proficient with the panther claw gain a +4 circumstance bonus when making disarm attempts with it.

Sabre

The sabre is a common cavalry weapon in the East. It is intended for one-handed use from horseback, or two-handed use on foot. Although it is classified as an exotic weapon, it may be wielded as a martial weapon by a mounted character, or by a character using it in both hands.
Movement
Hands Used
Classification
Mounted
One Handed
Martial
Mounted
Two Handed
Exotic
On Foot
One Handed
Exotic
On Foot
Two Handed
Martial


Sai

A sai’s pronglike extrusions are designed to parry and to help catch and disarm opponents’ weapons. At first, your sai gives you a +3 shield bonus. The Weapon Focus Feat (Sai) gives you an additionnal +1 shield bonus. In addition, if you attempt to disarm your opponent using a sai, you gain a +4 bonus on the opposed attack roll. You don’t gain any bonus if someone tries to disarm you of your sai.

Scimitar, Double

The curved blades of the double scimitar are used most effectively when spinning and twirling with the weapon. Despite its size, the weapon benefits more from quick, precise movement than from brute force. The double scimitar is a double weapon. You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons as if you are using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. A creature using a double weapon in one hand can’t use it as a double weapon.

Scourge

A scourge is a multi-tailed whip with barbed tips. Unlike a standard whip, the tails of a scourge are much shorter, allowing only attacks against adjacent opponents. Because a scourge’s tails can wrap around an opponent’s leg or other limb, you can make trip attacks with it. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the scourge to avoid being tripped. When using a scourge, you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an opponent (including the roll to keep from being disarmed if the attack fails).

Stump Knife

A stump knife is akin to a punching dagger, except that it can be securely attached to the stump of a missing forelimb. For someone proficient in its use, the stump knife becomes an extension of his body. Against foes to whom you have dealt damage during a continuous melee, the stump knife’s threat range is doubled (17–20). Your opponent cannot disarm you of a stump knife.

Sword, War

Also known as a bastard sword or hand-and- a-half sword, the war sword is intended for one-handed use from horseback, or two-handed use on foot. Although it is classified as an exotic weapon, it may be wielded as a martial weapon by a mounted character, or by a character using it in both hands. Note that its game statistics are slightly different depending on whether it is being wielded in one hand or two. Any time a war sword is being wielded in two hands, it may be used as a finesse weapon and to make piercing attacks. The table below summarises the various uses of the war sword.

Movement
Hands Used
Classification
Finesse?
Mounted
One Handed
Martial
No
Mounted
Two Handed
Exotic
Yes
On Foot
One Handed
Exotic
No
On Foot
Two Handed
Martial
Yes


Talwar

The Talwar (not to be confused with the Tulwar) is a curved, pointed sword, wide at the base and tapering down to a sharp point like a curved triangle. Like the Kora this weapon is often used for religious sacrificial rites in Vendhya.

Tiger Claw

The Khitan version of the “bagh nakh”. This is a strap or glove fitted with spikes in the palm and wielded like brass knuckles. Your opponent cannot use a disarm action to disarm you of tiger claws. An attack with tiger claws is considered an armed attack. The tiger claw is both a weapon and a climbing tool. Using a pair of tiger claws while climbing grants a +1 circumstance bonus on Climb checks. This bonus does not stack with the +2 bonus from using a climber’s kit, because they’re essentially the same circumstance.

Trident

A trident is a three pronged spear used to catch fish. Many coastal regions use the trident as a weapon. It is especially popular in Argossean gladiatorial arenas. The trident can be thrown. If you use a ready action to set a trident against a charge, you deal double damage on a successful hit against a charging character. It can be used with one or two hands.

Tulwar

This two-handed, heavy curved sword resembles a massive scimitar. It is wielded for its sheer cutting power and sometimes as a symbol of rank among warriors of the East.

War Fan

This weapon appears to the untrained eye as nothing more than a beautifully crafted lady’s fan. In fact, the vanes of the fan are crafted from steel, and the tips are needle-sharp. When first entering melee using a war fan, you may attempt a Bluff check against an opponent’s Sense Motive check. If you win the contest, you gain a +4 bonus on attacks made against that foe during the first round of combat.

Whip

A whip deals nonlethal damage, though if it deals 4 or more damage in a single blow, one point of this damage is considered to be lethal damage. It deals no damage to any creature with Damage Reduction of 3 or higher, whether from armour or natural DR. The whip is treated as a melee weapon with 15-foot reach, though you do not threaten the area into which you can make an attack. In addition, unlike most other weapons with reach, you can use it against foes anywhere within your reach, including adjacent foes. Using a whip provokes an attack of opportunity, just as if you had used a ranged weapon. You can make trip attacks with a whip. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can drop the whip to avoid being tripped. When using a whip, you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an opponent, including the roll to keep from being disarmed if the attack fails. Whips are finesse weapons. A whip can also be used to torture captives, granting a +2 circumstance bonus to all Profession (torturer) checks.

Whip-Dagger

A character who takes the Exotic Weapon Proficiency (whip) feat is also proficient in the whip-dagger. Unlike standard whips, the whip-dagger’s ability to deal damage is unhindered by armor bonuses and natural armor bonuses.

Zweihanders

The enormous Aquilonian great blade that often stand taller than their wielder. The sword is designed to allow eight points of attack along its length.

6. Weapon Quality

There are almost no specifically ‘magical’ weapons in the Hyborian age. However, weapons of superior and inferior quality are sometimes available.

The standard weapons listed in the Weapons table are assumed to be of average quality. On occasion, it may be necessary to wield weapons of lesser quality; conversely, an adventurer who is fortunate enough to get his hands on a better quality weapon will likely not give it up until it is prised from his dead fingers or lost in the corpse of his enemy.

Primitive Weapons

Primitive weapons are found in any place where it is hard to get good quality materials or where the craftsmen are relatively low skilled or, more commonly, both. This is particularly the case throughout the Pictish Wilderness and in many of the Black Kingdoms. Occasionally, primitive weapons can be found in more advanced nations, especially in frontier or isolated regions where both materials and smiths may be of low quality.

Primitive weapons are usually only simple weapons, though occasionally primitive martial weapons are made. None of the exotic weapons can be made as primitive weapons. All primitive weapons are brittle and tend not to be as durable or keep as good edges as standard weapons. They are usually made from stone, copper, bronze or poor quality iron.

Primitive weapons have only half the Hardness of standard weapons (rounded down) and their Armour Piercing value is reduced by two, to a minimum of zero. Furthermore, primitive weapons break if they strike completely ineffectively against a metal-armoured character; that is, if the armour’s DR reduces the primitive weapon’s damage to zero, the weapon is broken.

Primitive weapons cost only one-half the cost listed in the Weapons table, rounded down. For example: A primitive war spear still does d10 damage with a ×3 critical. However, its Armour Piercing value is zero and its hardness is only three. It costs only one sp.

Masterwork Weapons

Masterwork weapons are made by master-smiths and wielded by the greatest of warriors and wealthiest of nobles. They are a cut above common blades but do not match the legendary hardness or sharpness of the fabled blades of Akbitan.

Masterwork weapons grant an enhancement bonus of +1 to attack rolls, have a +1 bonus to Armour Piercing and +1 Hardness. They cost twice as much as normal weapons.

Akbitanan Weapons

The expertise of the Akbitanan smiths combines with superb locally mined high-grade steel mined to produce weapons that have near-perfect balance, unsurpassed hardness and a strength and flexibility that renders them almost indestructible.

Akbitanan weapons can generally be found for sale only in Akbitan itself; these weapons are so famed that the smiths of that city have more than enough business without actively exporting their wares.

Almost all Akbitanan-manufactured weapons are martial or exotic. Bladed arms such as daggers, swords and scimitars are the Akbitanan smiths’ preferred products. It might just be possible to persuade an Akbitanan smith to manufacture another weapon but he is unlikely to be willing to make a hafted weapon such as a spear or axe. This is because such a weapon must necessarily rely on a wooden shaft for much of its strength and no smith can guarantee the strength of wood.

Akbitanan weapons grant an enhancement bonus of +1 to attack rolls, +1 to damage rolls and +2 to Armour Piercing. Furthermore, they have 1.5 times the usual Hardness and double the usual Hit Points for the weapon type (round down). An Akbitanan weapon costs five times the cost of the base weapon (minimum 50 sp).

Silver Weapons

At great expense, a weapon can be made of solid silver so that it bypasses the Damage Reduction of creatures such as demons. This is done only rarely – far more commonly a character must use an improvised weapon.

This is only practical for bludgeoning or piercing weapons. A silver slashing weapon cannot function, as it cannot hold an edge.

A silver piercing weapon can just barely work, as it need not be quite so razor-sharp as a slashing weapon. Even then, it is not so efficient as the usual iron equivalent – on a successful attack with a silver piercing weapon, the wielder takes a –1 penalty on the damage roll (with the usual minimum of 1 point of damage). Silver bludgeoning weapons have no penalty.

Silver weapons have –1 Hardness and –1 hit points (minimum 1 in both cases) in comparison to their normal equivalents. They cost an additional 50 sp x (weapon weight in lb).

Broken Weapons

Broken weapons count as improvised and so bestow a –4 non-proficiency penalty to attack rolls and a –1 penalty to Parry Defence when used to parry.

A weapon must be at least a one-handed melee weapon to be usable when broken. Light weapons are destroyed outright.

Treat a broken one-handed bladed weapon as a poniard and a broken two-handed bladed weapon as a scimitar or arming sword, depending on its size. Broken weapons only ever inflict slashing damage, as they no longer have sharp points. A broken weapon retains its original hardness and has the same number of Hit Points as a poniard or scimitar.

All broken weapons (like all improvised weapons) score critical threats only on unmodified rolls of 20.

7. Strength Ratings for Bows

All bows are made with a certain ‘pull’. The greater the pull, the more force can be put behind the arrow but the harder the bow is to draw. In game terms, some bows are made with a strength rating. A strength rating is given as the Strength modifier the weapon is ideally suited for and is given in brackets after the bow. For example, a Bossonian longbow made for a character of Strength 8 to 9 would be written as a ‘Bossonian longbow (–1)’ whereas a Shemite bow made for a character of Strength 16 or 17 would be written as a Shemite bow (+3).

The strength rating of a bow indicates the maximum amount of additional damage from Strength that can be added to the damage of its arrows. A character shooting a bow always modifies damage and Armour Piercing ratings with the worse of his Strength modifier and the strength rating of the bow. In addition, a character whose Strength modifier is less than the strength rating of the bow has a –2 circumstance penalty on his attack rolls with that bow.

For bows with strength ratings of +1 or above, the cost to buy the bow is increased by +20 sp for each +1 of the strength rating.

For example, a character of Strength 16 has a Strength bonus of +3. If he were proficient with the Bossonian longbow, the ideal weapon for him to wield would be a Bossonian longbow (+3), at a cost of 80 sp. He would deal 1d10+3 damage with this weapon and it would have an Armour Piercing value of 8. If he instead chose a Bossonian longbow (+2) at a cost of 60 sp, he would only deal 1d10+2 damage (AP 7). If he picked up a Bossonian longbow (+4), he would still deal only 1d10+3 damage (AP 8) and suffer a –2 penalty on his attack rolls with it.

If, on the other hand, a character with Strength 8 picked up a Bossonian longbow (+1) he would deal 1d10–1 damage with an Armour Piercing value of 4, and suffer a –2 penalty on his attack rolls with it.

8. Ammunitions

Missile
Cost (SP)
Damage
Critical
AP
Range Increment
Hardness
HP
Weight (lb)
Type
Arrows, Standard (20)
10% of the weapon’s price
--
--
--
--
5
1
Same as the weapon
Piercing
Arrow, Alchemist’s (1)
The weapon’s price
Subdual *
--
0
--
5
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Bludgeoning
Arrow, Blunt (1)
5% of the weapon’s price
Subdual
+1
0
/2
5
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Bludgeoning
Arrow, Cutting (1)
10% of the weapon’s price
-- *
--
0
--
5
1
10% of the weapon’s weight
Slashing
Arrow, Dousing (1)
50% of the weapon’s price
Subdual *
--
0
--
5
1
10% of the weapon’s weight
Bludgeoning
Arrow, Fire (1)
10% of the weapon’s price
-- *
--
--
--
5
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Piercing
Arrow, Flight (1)
5% of the weapon’s price
--
--
--
X1.5
5
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Piercing
Arrow, Grappling * (1)
25% of the weapon’s price
Subdual
--
0
-20 Ft
10
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Bludgeoning
Arrow, Hardwood * (20)
20% of the weapon’s price
--
--
--
--
10
1
Same as the weapon
Piercing
Arrow, Signal * (1)
10% of the weapon’s price
--
--
--
--
5
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Piercing
Arrow, Silent * (1)
10% of the weapon’s price
--
--
--
-10 Ft
5
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Piercing
Arrow, Smoke * (1)
50% of the weapon’s price
Subdual
--
0
--
5
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Bludgeoning
Bolt (10)
20% of the weapon’s price
--
--
--
--
5
1
10% of the weapon’s weight
Piercing
Bolt, Knockback (5)
The weapon’s price
-- *
--
--
--
5
1
10% of the weapon’s weight
Piercing
Bolt, Blunt (5)
50% of the weapon’s price
Subdual
+1
0
/2
5
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Bludgeoning
Bolt, Penetrating (5)
50% of the weapon’s price
--
--
+3
--
5
1
5% of the weapon’s weight
Piercing
Blowgun Darts (10)
1
--
--
--
--
--
--
0.5
Piercing
Sling Bullets (10)
1
--
--
--
--
--
--
0.5
Bludgeoning

Arrow, Alchemist’s

Each of these projectiles carries a deadly load of alchemist’s fire in its hollow shaft. When it strikes a target, the arrow’s deals non lethal damage and the shaft shatters, releasing the alchemist’s fire directly onto the target. One round after impact, the alchemist’s fire ignites, dealing 1d4 points of damage. The target can use a full-round action to attempt to extinguish the flames before taking this damage. It takes a successful Reflex saving throw (DC 15) to extinguish the flames. Rolling on the ground earns the target a +2 bonus on the save. Submerging (such as by leaping into a lake) or magically extinguishing the flames automatically kills the flames.

Arrow, Blunt

These arrows have wooden tips specially crafted to deal subdual damage instead of normal damage. The range Increment is divided by 2 and the critical multiplier is increased by 1.

Arrow, Cutting

These arrows are tipped with broad, V-shaped cutting edges that have been honed to cut ropes rather than pierce armor. They can cut any rope less than 1 inch thick.

Arrow, Dousing

This arrow contains a small vial of water and foam that instantly douses any lantern, candle or torch it hits.

Arrow, Fire

This arrow’s tip has been soaked in pitch so that, after it is ignited, it stays lit when fired. A flammable target that is hits catches on fire.

Arrow, Flight

The light shaft and special design of this arrow increases a bow’s range increment by 1.5

Arrow, Grappling

This hook-tipped arrow has a short metal rod as part of the shaft. At the end of the rod is a metal ring meant to hold a rope. The use of a grappling arrow requires a successful ranged attack against DV10 (+1 per 10 feet of distance) The weight of the metal hooks, rod and rope itself means that this arrow reduces the range increment of any bow it is fired from by 20 feet.

Arrow, Hardwood

Hardwood shafts are simultaneously stronger and more flexible than a regular arrow's. A hardwood arrow that misses its target has only a 25% chance of being destroyed instead of 50%.

Arrow, Signal

This arrow is specially designed to emulate a specific sound when fired. The intricate carving on the arrow shafts makes them clumsy in flight, imposing a –2 circumstance penalty on attack rolls.

Arrow, Silent

This arrow features a narrow bodkin point and minimal fletching made of thin wood, making it slightly less stable in flight but also very, very quiet. It reduces the range increment of any bow that fires by 10 feet but requires a listen check (DC 21) for someone to hear it in flight.

Arrow, Smoke

The arrow is essentially a smokestick in the shape of an arrow that can be ignited and fired from a bow. It trails smoke behind and creates a cloud of smoke in a 10-foot cube where it strikes, but the arrow deals subdual damage. The smoke dissipates normally.

Bolt, Knockback

Whenever a knockback bolt hits its target, it initiates a bull rush attack in addition to dealing normal damage. To resolve the bull rush attempt, treat the projectile as a Medium creature with a +8 Strength bonus. The projectile doesn’t provoke an attack of opportunity, and it always tries to push the target as far back as possible.

Bolt, Blunt

These bolts have wooden tips specially crafted to deal subdual damage instead of normal damage. The range Increment is divided by 2 and the critical multiplier is increased by 1.

Bolt, Penetrating

These bolts are designed to pierce armors more easily. Your attacks made with these bolts gains 3 points of penetration.

9. Weapon Modifications

Not every broadsword is exactly the same as its counterpart forged in a village nearby, just as one nation’s quilted jerkins might be made differently from their neighbour’s. The key is modification. By adding or altering the normal template for a weapon or piece of armour, a whole new version of that item can be created.

Modifying a weapon or suit of armour requires a Craft (Blacksmithing) skill check respectively at a variable DC depending on the type of modification. Few experts use their talents cheaply, making it often more expensive than the original product by some margin.

Each entry below contains the modification’s name, the description of what it is, any weapon restrictions involved and the details of how difficult and costly the modification will be.

Modifying any masterwork weaponry costs four times as much as what is listed here and adds +5 to the DCs noted below.

Modifying any akbitanan weaponry costs ten times as much as what is listed here and adds +10 to the DCs noted below.

Modification
Cost (SP)
Type of Weapon
Craft DC
Basket Hilt
+30
One-Handed Swords Only
22
Bell Guard
+5
One-Handed Swords Only
18
Boring Spike
+15
Weapons with Bludgeoning Damage Only
18
Bowcaps
+25
Arbalest, Crossbows or Bow Types Only
20
Catching Quillions
+15
Swords Only
20
Fearsome Appearance
+25
All Weapons
20
Fencing Ring Grip
+10
All Finesse Weapons
20
Heavy Blade
+15
One Handed and Larger Slashing Weapons
22
Heavy Pommel
+12
One Handed and Larger Slashing or Bludgeoning Weapons
22
Martingale
+5
All Melee Weapons
15
Narrowed Point-of-Impact
+12
Weapons with Bludgeoning Damage Only
22
Repeating
+25
Crossbows Only
22
Serrated Blade
+50
Weapons with Piercing Damage
25
Serrated Edge
+35
Weapons with Slashing Damage
25
Spring Mounted Pommel Blade
+10
All Melee Weapons
15
Thickened Section
+10
Weapons with Reach Only
18

Basket Hilt

An iron or bronze web cast around the hilt of a fighter’s sword is enough to sometimes turn away a blow, especially in the hands of a skilled warrior. It adds weight to the weapon, but a good fencer or duellist knows how to compensate for this. Adding a basket hilt to a sword will add +1 to the wielder’s Parry Defence with the weapon, but it adds a full 2 pounds of metal to the weapon’s weight.

One-Handed Swords Only
DC 22 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+30 sp


Bell Guard

This sword guard completely covers the top of the wielder's hand, granting a +2 circumstance bonus for the purposes of defending against disarm attacks. Weapons with this modification may not have any other hilt modifications.

One-Handed Swords Only
DC 18 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+5 sp


Boring Spike

Any hammer, club or mace is deadly when enough force is applied behind its attacks, but adding a conical metal spike to its surface adds a piercing ability that they sometimes lack. Any weapon with a boring spike added to it adds Piercing to its damage type and +1 to its Armour Piercing value; but reduces its Hardness by 1 due to the breach to the weapon’s integrity by the spike’s anchor.

Weapons with Bludgeoning Damage Only
DC 18 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+15 sp


Bowcaps

The addition of small metal blades to the outer points of a bow’s body or crossbow’s arm gives an archer a potential melee weapon if needed. The blades are heated and driven into the wood, making them stable – but also unfortunately easy to drive too far into the wood and split it. A bow or crossbow with bowcaps can be used as a melee weapon that inflicts 1d6 damage, but whenever a melee attack inflicts more damage than the weapon’s Hardness (after damage modifiers) the weapon suffers 1d4 Hit Points of damage.

Arbalest, Crossbows or Bow Types Only
DC 20 Craft (bowyer)
+25 sp


Catching Quillions

Many parries are caught on the crossbar of a sword’s hilt and not its blade, so the welding of large prongs or quillions to the top of a sword’s hilt increase that ability even more. A sword that has catching quillions gains a +2 bonus to Parry Defence with the weapon, but its uncomfortable hand grip now imposes a –1 penalty to hit.

Swords Only
DC 20 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+15 sp


Fearsome Appearance

This modification adds grisly trophies, decorations and colourful pigments to a weapon to make it unique and striking, attracting attention to the warrior wielding it and striking fear in his enemies. A weapon that has received a fearsome appearance adds +1 to the wielder’s Intimidate skill checks as long as the weapon is brandished in an obviously threatening manner.

All Weapons
DC 20 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+25 sp


Fencing Ring Grip

The grip is a ring above the quillions of a blade; the user can put his or her fingers through it, allowing for greater control of the weapon. A ring grip may only be affixed to a fencing weapon. If the user has a Base Attack Bonus of +6 or moren the user may forfeit one of his attacks to feint, using his Bluff skill, instead of spending a standard action feinting. The user of the ring grip gains a +1 competence bonus to all Bluff checks made when feinting. Should the wielder be disarmed of his fencing weapon, he suffers 1D6 hit points, as any fingers he has in the ring grip are battered and possibly broken.

All Finesse Weapons
DC 20 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+10 sp


Heavy Blade

This weapon is weighted towards its blade, dealing 1D4 extra damage, but making the weapon more unwiedly. Weapons with this modifier require an Exotic Weapon Proficiency (Heavy Bladed Weapons) feat in addition to the usual proficiency. This modifification may be made to any one handed slashing melee weapon and larger, so long as it is not a double weapon. Weapons may not have both this and the heavy pommel modification.

One Handed and Larger Slashing Weapons
DC 22 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+15 sp


Heavy Pommel

This weapon is weighted towards its pommel, allowing its wielder to parry more easily, but dealing less damage. The weapon's damage dice are reduced by one die type, but the wielder gains a +2 bonus to Parry Defence while he has the weapon ready and not charging an opponent. This modification may be made to any one handed and larger slashing or bludgeoning weapon so long as it is not a double weapon. Weapons may not have both this and the heavy blade modification.

One Handed and Larger Slashing or Bludgeoning Weapons
DC 22 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+12 sp


Martingale

The martingale is a loop of cord attached to the pommel of a weapon which the wielder puts his hand through during combat. While others may disarm the wielder, the weapon remains attached at his wrist, halting any attempts to take the weapon away.

All Melee Weapons
DC 15 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+5 sp


Narrowed Point-of-Impact

Most bludgeoning weapons are designed to spread a massive amount of force across a large area of the weapon’s head to inflict its damage, but by slimming down the surface area the damage can become more focussed. A weapon with this modification reduces the weapon’s Hardness and Hit Points both by 1, but increases its effective Armour Piercing by +1.

Weapons with Bludgeoning Damage Only
DC 22 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+12 sp


Repeating

A repeating crossbow holds 3 crossbow bolts. As long as it holds bolts, you can reload it by pulling the reloading lever (a free action with your off hand). Loading a new case of 3 bolts needs to use both hands and is a full-round action that provokes attacks of opportunity.

Crossbows Only
DC 22 Craft (bowyer)
+25 sp


Serrated Blade

The serrated blade inflicts extra damage on critical hits. X2 weapons become X3 and so on.

Weapons with Piercing Damage
DC 25 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+50 sp


Serrated Edge

By notching and sharpening the edges on a bladed weapon, a deadly weapon that tears and saws its way through flesh is created. A weapon with a serrated edge reduces its Armour Piercing by 1 and its Hardness by 2, but increases its damage by +2.

Weapons with Slashing Damage
DC 25 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+35 sp


Spring Mounted Pommel Blade

This sword's pommel contains a hidden, retractable stiltto that no gentleman would ever admit to using. The weaopns springs out as a free action.

All Melee Weapons
DC 15 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+10 sp


Thickened Section

The notorious weakness of any hafted weapon is its wooden length, making it decidedly weaker than all- metal weaponry like swords or maces. This modification adds circular rings or bands of metal to the central section of a weapon’s haft. These rings give the weapon an additional area with which to parry, but increase the weapon’s weight significantly. A thickened section adds 1 to the weapon’s Hardness rating, but also adds three pounds to the weapon’s weight.

Weapons with Reach Only
DC 18 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+10 sp


II. ARMOURS

Having chosen a weapon, a smart warrior also should choose quality armour, armour I almost always have in stock and, if not, can get quickly for you. Armour protects you from harm by absorbing damage from an enemy’s blows.

1. Armour Informations

To wear heavier armour effectively, a character can select the Armour Proficiency feats, but most classes are automatically proficient with the armours that work best for them.

Armour and shields can take damage from some types of attacks.

Here is the format for armour entries, given as column headings on the Armour and Shield tables below.

Cost: The cost of the armour for Small or Medium humanoid creatures.

Damage Reduction: Whenever a character is hit in combat, whether from a melee or ranged weapon, the Damage Reduction (DR) score of any armour he is wearing at the time is deducted from the damage rolled by the weapon.

Maximum Dex/Dodge: This number is the maximum Dexterity bonus to Dodge Defence that this type of armour allows. The Dexterity bonus that you add to your Dodge Defence cannot exceed this number while you are wearing the armour. Heavier armours limit mobility, reducing the wearer’s ability to dodge blows. This restriction does not affect any other Dexterity-related abilities. Your Parry Defence is unaffected by the armour you are wearing.

Even if a character’s Dodge Defence is effectively +0 because of armour, the character can still dodge. He is not counted as ‘unable to dodge’ for the purposes of sneak attacks.

Your character’s encumbrance (the amount of gear he carries) may also restrict the maximum Dexterity bonus to Dodge Defence that he can use.

Shields: Shields do not affect a character’s maximum Dexterity bonus to Dodge Defence.

Armour Check Penalty: Any armour heavier than a quilted jerkin penalises a character’s ability to use some skills. An armour check penalty number is the penalty that applies to Balance, Climb, Escape Artist, Hide, Jump, Move Silently, Sleight of Hand and Tumble checks when a character is wearing a certain kind of armour. Double the normal armour check penalty is applied to Swim checks. A character’s encumbrance (the amount of gear carried, including armour) may also apply an armour check penalty.

Shields: If a character is wearing armour and using a shield, both armour check penalties apply.

Nonproficient with Armour Worn: A character who wears armour and/or uses a shield with which he is not proficient takes the armour’s (and/or shield’s) armour check penalty on attack rolls and on all Strength-based and Dexterity-based ability and skill checks. The penalty for nonproficiency with armour stacks with the penalty for nonproficiency with shields.

Sorcery Failure: Armour interferes with the gestures that a sorcerer must make to cast an arcane spell that has a somatic component. Sorcerers thus face the possibility of sorcery failure if they are wearing armour.

Casting a Spell in Armour: A character who casts a spell while wearing armour must usually make a sorcery failure roll. The number in the Sorcery Failure column on the Armour table is the chance that the spell fails and is ruined. If the spell lacks a somatic component, however, it can be cast with no chance of sorcery failure.

Shields: If a character is wearing armour and using a shield, add the two numbers together to get a single sorcery failure chance.

Sleeping in Armour: A character who sleeps in medium or heavy armour is automatically fatigued the next day. He takes a –2 penalty on Strength and Dexterity and cannot charge or run. Sleeping in light armour does not cause fatigue.

Speed: Medium or heavy armour The number on the Armour table while wearing the armour.

Shields: Shields do not affect a character’s speed.

Weight: This column gives the weight of the armour sized for a Medium wearer. Armour fitted for Small characters weighs half as much and armour for Large characters weighs twice as much.

Armour
Cost (SP)
Damage Reduction
Maximum Dex Bonus
Armour Check Penalty
Sorcery Failure
Speed
Weight (lb)
Light Armour
Horse-hide Jerkin
8
4
+6
--
30%
30 ft
4
Leather Jerkin
10
4
+6
-1
40%
30 ft
5
Mail Shirt
400
5
+4
-3
60%
30 ft
20
Quilted Jerkin
45
3
+7
--
30%
30 ft
2
Suede Coat
100
2
+8
--
20%
30 ft
3
Wicker Tabard
30
3
+6
--
25%
30 ft
2
Medium Armour
Breastplate
2000
6
+4
-4
70%
25 ft
20
Brigandine Coat
300
6
+2
-5
70%
25 ft
30
Chahar-aina
2000
6
+4
-4
70%
25 ft
20
Hyperborean Hide
150
6
+4
-3
50%
25 ft
20
Laminated Wood
300
5
+3
-6
70%
25 ft
25
Mail Hauberk
800
6
+3
-4
80%
25 ft
35
Pit Straps
500
4
+4
-5
75%
30 ft
18
Scale Corselet
100
5
+3
-4
75%
25 ft
25
Heavy Armour
Bronze Scale Hauberk
170
5
+2
-5
90%
25 ft
40
Mail Hauberk and Breastplate
2800
9
+1
-8
95%
25 ft
55
Mail Hauberk and Brigandine Coat
1100
9
+0
-9
95%
25 ft
65
Mail Hauberk and Chahar-aina
3600
9
+1
-8
95%
25 ft
55
Mail Hauberk and Scale Corselet
900
8
+0
-8
90%
25 ft
60
Mail Hauberk and Scale Hauberk
1000
9
+0
-10
100%
25 ft
75
Mail Shirt and Breastplate
2400
8
+2
-7
85%
25 ft
40
Mail Shirt and Brigandine Coat
700
8
+1
-8
85%
25 ft
50
Mail Shirt and Chahar-aina
2400
8
+2
-7
85%
25 ft
40
Mail Shirt and Scale Corselet
500
7
+1
-7
80%
25 ft
45
Mail Shirt and Scale Hauberk
600
8
+0
-9
100%
25 ft
60
Plate Armour
6500
10
+2
-6
95%
25 ft
55
Plated Kit
3000
8
+3
-5
95%
25 ft
35
Scale Hauberk
200
6
+1
-6
90%
25 ft
40
Helmets
Great Helm
+350
+2
--
-2#
10%
--
7
Grille
+25
+1
--
--
15%
--
4
Steel Cap
+40
+1
--
--
10%
--
3
Visored Helm
+450
+1/+2
--
-/-2#
20%
--
5
Warhood
+100
+1
--
-1
10%
--
6

# Penalty applies to Listen and Spot checks only.

2. Armour Descriptions

Breastplate

Worn over a lightly quilted doublet (included in the cost), the breastplate gives maximum protection to the torso and still allows for rapid movement.

Brigandine Coat

A brigandine coat or ‘coat-of-plates’ uses large, overlapping steel plates sandwiched between two layers of heavy cloth or leather and riveted together, giving a heavy but effective protection to the torso.

Bronze Scale Hauberk

A scale hauberk is made of 450 or so bronze scales individually stitched in overlapping rows to a loose-fitting leather coat. The hauberk includes a thick leather collar to protect the neck.

Chahar-aina

The chahar-aina is also known as ‘four mirror’ armour, worn over quilted armour. Four plates, one over the chest, one over the back and one over each side comprise this regional armour.

Great Helm

The armour penalty for a great helm applies to Listen and Spot checks only.

Grille

A favourite of gladiators and pit fighters, the grille helmet is actually three pieces of armour sewn or riveted into one piece of fearsome headgear.

A hard leather cap and chin strap is riveted to a hammered metal helmet, often shaped like a predatory beast (bears, lions and dragons are favourites), and a row of tempered metal bars (sometimes spiked) are set as the ‘faceplate’ of the helm.

This sort of armoured is mostly used by fighters that like getting up close with their enemies – grille wearers add +1 to their unarmed and grappling-based damages.

Horse-hide Jerkin

Worn by Hyrkanians, this armour is hardened with urine and worn with a tightly woven silk shirt.

Hyperborean Hide

The wilds of northern Hyperborea are cold and harsh, filled with large predatory animals and brutal raiders. The older villages and tribes living by the traditional methods of their ancestors do not often keep heavy forges or smithies, leaving the ownership of finer quality armour to the tribal elders and veteran warriors.

Most northern Hyperboreans make tough armour by layering bear or mountain goat hides before soaking them in pine sap. The resulting sheets are then bent and hammered into wearable shapes that are often decorated with fur, teeth and sometimes polished wood or even ivory.

Laminated Wood

Although rare by common Hyborian standards, the Black Kingdoms, Kush and some tribes of the Pictish Wilderness use thin sheets of carved, shaped and laminated soft woods to create highly protective suits of armour.

Leather Jerkin

This is a cheap and simply made jacket of cowhide, thick enough to stop a glancing blow but a little encumbering.

Mail Shirt

The mail shirt only protects the torso, with the arms and perhaps hips being protected by quilted cloth or heavy leather.

Mail Hauberk

A mail hauberk covers the torso, arms and upper legs with mail armour and comes with greaves of steel plate to protect the lower legs. Mail hauberks are found throughout the world, though the best are made in Turan.

Pit Straps

Light bands of leather are reinforced with copper or bronze, spiked and studded throughout to make pit straps. Pit straps get their name from their most common wearer, the pit fighters of Shadizar or Tortage.

Due to the number of spikes, studs and rasps built into a set of pit straps, this armour inflicts 1d2 points of damage each round against any target currently grappling the wearer.

Plate Armour

The ultimate in protection, plate armour consists of shaped steel plates covering the entire body, from the tips of the toes to the crown of the head.

Plate armour is always made to fit the wearer, a process that will take several months and usually requires a sizable deposit upfront. There is a straight 20% chance that any given suit will almost fit a particular character, in which case it can be worn but with a maximum Dex bonus of +0.

A suit that almost fits in this manner can be re-sized to fit the character perfectly, as though it were made-to-measure. This will take 1d4 weeks and costs 500 sp per week.

Plated Kit

For warriors that do not wish to wear full sets of plated mail, whether because of expense or weight, a plated kit is a set of leathers with several plates covering the vitals of the wearer.

The shoulders, lower arms, thighs, abdomen and neck of the suit are heavily protected by these iron or even steel plates, but there are still many areas of the body that can be damaged. By taking a –4 penalty to hit against a plated kit, the Damage Reduction is reduced by 5.

Quilted Jerkin

Painstakingly hand-sewn from 20 or more layers of linen, the quilted jerkin is light and usually fits well, allowing for almost completely unencumbered movement but not offering so much protection as a good suit of mail or scale armour.

Scale Corselet

This is armour for the torso only, made from overlapping layers of small oval metal scales held together by woven laces. It is usually worn with some light limb protection such as thick boiled leather plates or even simply multiple layers of quilted linen or wool.

Scale corselets are common among mercenary bands and some of the Shemite nomads and Hyrkanian warriors.

Scale Hauberk

A scale hauberk covers the arms, torso and legs almost to the knee with metal scales similar to those used for a scale corselet. The lower legs may be protected by light mail armour, steel greaves or hardened leather plates.

Steel Cap

This also includes all open- faced helmets, such as the morion helms favoured by Argossean soldiers and sailors, the horned helmets of the Nordheimr and the plain conical helms worn by the nomads of Shem.

Most steel caps are simple, mass-produced items intended to protect the ordinary soldiery from glancing blows.

Suede Coat

Nobles and merchants can sometimes be found wearing long coats of padded suede to help protect them while retaining their opulent image.

These add a +1 modifier to any reputation checks made to recognise the wearer, so long as they are trying to show off their higher status.

Visored Helm

Visored helms include any helmets which have some means of opening out to allow the wearer to more easily see and breathe, including sallets, close-helmets and armets.

The armour penalty for a visored helm applies to Listen and Spot checks only. The penalty to Spot checks does not apply if the visor is worn up but in that case the visored helm only grants +1 Damage Reduction, rather than +2.

If the wearer has a free hand, he may put the visor up or down once per round as a free action.

Warhood

A coif of fine chain that weaves into a padded facemask, the warhood is not as protective as a true helm but it allows a warrior to wear any face he wishes on a battlefield. The faceplate of a warhood is purchased with a specific animal, creature or expression represented upon it.

This faceplate adds a +1 bonus to all Intimidate checks made while wearing the warhood.

Wicker Tabard

Sewn from hardened strands of wicker, this simple piece of armour is draped over the head and shoulders of the wearer and often secured with stiff leather or sometimes hemp cord.

It is a cheap and simple way to reduce slashing damage, but does little against blunt attacks. Bludgeoning damage reduces the Damage Reduction of a wicker tabard to 1.

Helmets

When a helmet is worn with a suit of armour, the two DRs are added together for all purposes.

If it becomes necessary to determine which of the two is left intact after an attack, assume that the helmet is the last piece of armour to be destroyed, unless the Games Master’s description of the combat specifies otherwise.

Layering Armour

Certain types of armour may be layered together, which grants better protection than either could alone. Often the bulk and weight of two layers of armour makes this an impractical solution, though for heavy combat it may almost be worth it.

All the combinations of armour that may be layered together are given their own entries in the Armour table. The result is always heavy armour.

Getting into and out of Armour

The time required to don armour depends on its type; see the Donning Armour table. Don: This column tells how long it takes a character to put the armour on. One minute is 10 rounds. Readying (strapping on) a shield is only a move action.

Don Hastily: This column tells how long it takes to put the armour on in a hurry. The armour check penalty and Damage Reduction for hastily donned armour are each 1 point worse than normal.

Remove: This column tells how long it takes to get the armour off. Loosing a shield (removing it from the arm and dropping it) is only a move action.

Armour Type
Don
Don Hastily
Remove
Shield (any)
1 move action
N/A
1 move action
Leather Jerkin, Mail Shirt, Quilted Jerkin, Brigandine Coat
1 minute
5 rounds
1 minutes *
Scale Hauberk, Mail Hauberk, Breastplate
4 minutes *
1 minute
1 minutes *
Plate Armour, Scale Hauberk, all Heavy Armour combinations
4 minutes **
4 minutes *
1d4+1 minutes *

* If the character has some help, cut this time in half. A single character doing nothing else can help one or two adjacent characters. Two characters cannot help each other don armour at the same time.
** The wearer must have help to don this armour. Without help, it can be donned only hastily.

3. Armour Quality

Like weapons, armour has something of a hierarchy of quality, with armour from the best smiths being both better-fitting and offering more protection.

There is no especially primitive armour; primitive nations such as the Black Kingdoms often have only leather or quilted jerkins available but these are not especially inferior in quality to those typically found throughout the Hyborian kingdoms.

Breastplates, plate armour and brigandine coats, even of standard quality, are generally only available in the Hyborian nations, though nobles from other regions may travel to the north to have plate armour made for them.

Masterwork armour has a maximum Dexterity bonus that is +1 higher than usual for the armour, its armor check penalty is lessened by 1, its sorcery failure is lessened by 10% and it weighs 10% less.

More importantly, it is significantly harder and will only be damaged if the wearer is dealt 25 hit points of damage, rather than the usual 20 hit points.

It costs three times as much as an equivalent suit of armour.

All magic armors are automatically considered to be of masterwork quality.

You can’t add the masterwork quality to armor after it is created; it must be crafted as a masterwork item.

If two suits of armour are combined, such as a mail hauberk and breastplate, the bonuses applies only if both suits of armour are masterwork.

Masterwork quality armour must be tailored to fit the wearer – a looted suit of superior armour can be reworked to fit its new owner but unless a Craft (armourer) check (DC 30) is made.

4. Armour Modifications

Modification
Cost (SP)
Type of Weapon
Craft DC
Arrow Padding
+30
Hide, Leather or Quilted Armour Only
20
Bladed Edge
+20
Plate Armour Only
22
Chainweave
+20
Mail Armour Only
18
Headbutting Blade
+15
Helms Only
20
Studs and Spikes
+35
All Armour
20

Arrow Padding

Lighter armour types rarely defend well against the powerful puncturing shots of a bow or crossbow, but this modification grants them some resistance. By sewing several pads of cotton and sawdust over vital areas of the armour it can slow down high-speed projectiles.

Although these arrow pads add 2 pounds to the armour’s weight and an additional –1 to its Armour Check Penalty, they increase the Damage Reduction of the armour by 2 to any ranged weapons that inflict piercing-type damage.

Hide, Leather or Quilted Armour Only
DC 20 Craft (Tanner)
+30 sp


Bladed Edge

This modification involves sharpening the metallic edge on the armour essentially adding an extra ‘blade’. This blade is considered wielded even when the wearer has no other hands free, or is bound, and inflicts 1d4 damage when used.

Avoiding hurting oneself on the edge requires the wearer to be additionally careful, adding an extra –1 to the Armour Check Penalty.

Plate Armour Only
DC 22 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+20 sp


Chainweave

A mail shirt is good protection, but its construction leaves several holes through which a weapon could pierce. Careful winding of wicker or leather straps across these holes makes a more solid bank of protection, but causes the mail to be stiff and inflexible.

This modification adds 1 to the Damage Reduction of the armour, but reduces its Maximum Dexterity Bonus by –1 and increases its Armour Check Penalty by –1.

Mail Armour Only
DC 18 Craft (weaver/tailor)
+20 sp


Headbutting Blade

By riveting on a stout metal blade on the forehead or bridge of the nosepiece and reinforcing the area behind it, the warrior with this helm modification can deliver deadly blows in close combat.

The helm imposes a –1 penalty to all Spot skill checks because of the eight-inch blade in the way, but the wearer can use the blade as part of an unarmed attack (head butt) that will inflict 1d6 lethal damage with a critical threat range of 20/x2.

This attack can even be used while the warrior is being grappled – but he cannot try to break the grapple that round if he does so.

Helms Only
DC 20 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+15 sp


Studs and Spikes

This modification will not only make the armour look savage and fearsome, but it will also inflict 1d3 points of damage each round against any target currently grappling/ grappled by the wearer.

This makes the armour slightly more difficult to safely move around in, adding –1 to the Armour Check Penalty and reducing the Maximum Dexterity Bonus by –1. NOTE: Pit straps modified in this fashion have their damage dice turned to 1d4.

All Armour
DC 20 Craft (Blacksmithing)
+35 sp


III. Shields

1. Shield Descriptions

Shields share some characteristics with armour and some with weapons, as well as having some qualities entirely their own.

All shields have a shield bonus. This is added to the Parry Defence of any character who is parrying.

In addition, a shield offer the opportunity to parry a ranged attack. This represents the relative ease of ducking down behind a shield to evade missiles.

All shields can be used to make shield bash attacks if desired but a shield used in this way does not add its parry bonus to the character’s Parry Defence that round.

All the shields have Armour Check Penalties listed, as with armour. If a character wears armour and carries a shield, add the relevant Armour Check Penalties together.

Shield
Cost
Shield Bonus
Armor Check Penalty
Sorcery Failure
Damage
Critical
AP
Hardness
Hit Points
Weight (Lb)
Type
Aspis
8
+3
-2
15%
1D4
X2
--
10
8
6
Bludgeoning
Buckler
5
+2
-1
20%
1D6
X2
1
10
4
2
Bludgeoning
Duellist Cape
25
+1
--
5%
--
--
--
4
4
3
--
Scarab
15
+4
-3
10%
1D6
X2
1
8
8
7
Slashing
Shield, Large
7
+4
-4
15%
1D4
X2
0
6
10
8
Bludgeoning
Targe
3
+3
-2
30%
1D4
X2
0
6
6
4
Bludgeoning

Aspis

The traditional shield of the hoplite warrior, the aspis is a round metal shield with bevelled edges that is strapped to the forearm and held by a riveted leather strap in the warrior’s off-hand.

It is often sculpted with the army insignia or soldier’s crest, adding a personal element to each aspis. Most soldiers using an aspis wield shorter swords or stout spears, weapons that are perfect for stabbing around the sides of the shield’s round edge.

Buckler

This is a small, round shield made from steel and designed to deflect attacks rather than stop them directly. The buckler is held in the fist by a single handle.

It is versatile enough to make an effective weapon, too, since it is relatively light and agile but also very hard. A buckler is classed as a light weapon if used to make shield bash attacks.

Duellist Cape

Originally a regular sight in Zingaran courts, the duellist cape is the ‘shield’ of the noble fencers and swordsmen of that nation.

It is a heavy leather half-cape that hangs over the shoulder and upper arm of the fighter’s off-hand, allowing him to block or misdirect light blows without compromising his fighting ability.

A character wearing a duellist cape adds +2 to the bluff check to make feint combat manoeuvres.

Scarab

The traditional shield of the Stygian heavy infantry, a scarab shield is a fire-hardened bronze ring set around a deeply concave ebony bowl styled after the abdomen carapace of a scarab beetle.

The bronze ring is traditionally sharpened to be used as a secondary weapon.

Shield, Large

The shield covers everything from a knight’s triangular shield to the large round shields favoured by the Gundermen and Nordheimr. All large shields are made of layers of wood and softer materials such as canvas, rawhide and leather. Sometimes a large shield will have a steel boss in the centre.

A large shield is usually strapped to the left arm and held by a handgrip in the left hand.

It may instead be strapped to the shoulder to allow for two weapons or a two-handed weapon to be used, in which case it no longer confers a shield bonus to your Parry Defence but does confer a +2 shield bonus to Dodge Defence when dodging ranged attacks.

A shield strapped to the shoulder allows you to parry attacks if you should be left without a weapon in your hand, although it conveys no shield bonus to Parry Defence.

Alternatively, a large shield may be strapped to the back, in which case it may not be used to parry with at all but instead gives +2 DR against one opponent per round when the wearer is flanked.

A large shield is classed as a one-handed weapon if used to make shield bash attacks.

Targe

The targe is a small, round wooden shield covered in a layer of thick leather and studded with steel. It has two straps, one of which goes over the forearm, with the second being held in the hand.

This allows for an off-hand weapon to be held in the same hand as the targe, though if this is done the targe’s shield bonus to Parry Defence is reduced to +1. The shield bonus to Dodge Defence against ranged attacks is unaffected.

A targe is classed as a one-handed weapon if used to make shield bash attacks.

2. Shield Quality

Masterwork shield weighs 10% less, its armor check penalty is lessened by 1, its sorcery failure is lessened by 10% and it weighs 10% less.

More importantly, more resistant than regular shields ; increase its Hardness and Hit Points by 2.

It costs three times as much as an equivalent shield.

All magic shields are automatically considered to be of masterwork quality.

You can’t add the masterwork quality to shields after it is created; it must be crafted as a masterwork item.